Giving up the Ghost

Note: more Richard Armitage in the next post.

Sorry to stay in geek mode, but that’s who I am, and this article is so good, I had to share it. For those who are on WordPress, you may have already seen it. If not, hopefully, you will trip over it here:

Fortune contributor Brent Schlender shares some of the stories and personal photographs he collected during more than two decades as Steve Jobs’ chronicler and confidant.

Jobs’ scribe: Schlender (left) interviewing Jobs at a Next company picnic

FORTUNE — Most of us who wrote in depth about the brilliant career of Steve Jobs sooner or later came to realize that we were complicit in the making of a modern myth. You simply couldn’t avoid it. And while it is true that Jobs was as charismatic as Clooney and as manipulative as Machiavelli, the legend we helped him construct served many purposes beyond pumping up his own ego. He was an irresistible force who knew that in order to bring to market the amazing technological wonders that bubbled in his imagination, he also had to become the Svengali of the digital revolution that was to be the hallmark of his generation.

Nevertheless, Steve was merely mortal. And his storied life was one of dissonances and contradictions. He proudly flouted authority, yet he embodied extreme self-discipline. He wouldn’t suffer fools, but that wouldn’t keep him from turning on the charm to woo a “bozo” who had something he needed. He was the ultimate nano-manager, who also could limn the grand strokes of a big picture that others rarely could fully perceive without his help.

Read the rest.

3 Comments

  1. Merci Beaucoup! Glad you linked as I hadn’t seen this one :)

  2. “Finally, there are a very few in each generation who in spite of all life’s troubles cling with more and more inwardness to this ‘I cannot do otherwise’. They are the geniuses.” Kierkegaard.

  3. […] Next Post Didn’t I say this was the upcoming post? Yes, I’m feeling a bit cheesy, which is good for this blog. It’s when I don’t […]


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