Has Netflix Renewed Their Contract with BBC?

North and South NetflixAccording to a commenter, JustLuthen, it’s a done deal:

“I just spoke with Netflix. It has renewed its contract with the BBC and RA’s not going anywhere.”

Thanks, Luthen. It’s a great message on a Monday morning, and my optimist is clinging onto it. Not because I need to watch the Netflix version of North and South, or MI-5 (Spooks) or Robin Hood, but because it’s such an easy way to turn potential fans onto Richard Armitage.

Maybe some of the rest of you can also call to ensure that Netflix means what they say! :D

edit: Spooks is not staying. Bummer.

What Variety should have said about the shows not staying:

Fans should ‘plain that “Fawlty Towers,” “Blackadder,” “MI-5″ and “Red Dwarf” will no longer be available on Feb. 1.

:D

Through the Eyes of the Artist

Whatever else anyone sees, an artist sees something worthy; otherwise, why spend the time to convey something to the rest of us.

This captures some of the essence of my banner picture, an essence which can still rivet me, and I guess some of you as well:

richard_armitage_portrait_by_dmkozicka-d63de8e[Click to see the original]

If you have never watched Richard Armitage as Guy of Gisborne, do yourself a favor and give it try. The show was not the greatest, but he makes up for it.

#4 Richard Armitage and His Hair

This is part of my series of posts counting down to and through the Thanksgiving holidays and expressing my thankfulness for something I’ve received, experienced or participated in.

Richard and His Hair.

Richard Armitage has excellent hair. I’ve thought that ever since I saw this:

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It was a vast improvement over the extensions:

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But back to the luscious locks:

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Is that seriously awesome looking hair or what? Women would kill to have hair like this. And if those are extensions around his neck, I don’t want to hear about it! That looks real.

And I’m going to stay off the topic of his sideburns as I absolutely despised long sideburns until I saw them on Richard. I’m not kidding when I say that. I cannot stand long sideburns. They look awful to me, but Richard can wear them, and I’m thinking about a wolf whistle.

About the time I got used to the magnificent mullet, I was hit with this:

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That’s the mother of all razor cuts. I mean all razor cuts are or should be defined by it, and when their barbers are suggesting razor cuts, men should aspire to this cut. Not 6’2″, don’t have beautiful blue eyes and a great jaw? No problem. There’s a cut that fixes all of that. I can hear the thinking now.

And then there was this which created a backlash in RA Universe. A significant number were saying ewwwww to Guy’s new do. Me? I loved it. Even when it was unwashed the first few weeks, but man, he cleaned up well:

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Then it was back to the sleek look:

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Where he stayed until this came around:

press_conference_screencapI’m a beard person, so this was fantastic to me.

And since then, I’ve been treated to all types of styles to please any appraising eye.

A little bit of a pompadour going on in this one:
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Not much hair shown; this was the brutally short look:
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Okay, so it’s not all of his hair, but Thorin’s mane is fantastic. I had to show it, and you get some chest hair thrown in:
Richard Armitage Thorin bloody

Back to the tailored look, and I’m talking the hair:
'the hobbit - an unexpected journey' world film premiere, wellington, new zealand - 28 nov 2012, ,

This one is the I don’t give a rat’s ass how I look ’cause I’m considering that prisoner of war role:

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And finally the pompadour is perfected:

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That particular photo still packs a punch.

Heck, it’s just been more or less a thrill ride to see what he would come with next, and it occurred to me that there is no need to get antsy about his next project and every reason to be thankful for being entertained by his hair. To wit:

Richard Armitage curly locksIs there enough going on here to make a ponytail for Poldark?

And if I get bored with this, I can go back to some old photos.

Here’s a favorite:

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See what I mean about the sideburns?

The Many Modes of Richard Armitage Fans

I lied — again. I’m getting to the phantom Diary entry after this post.

I understand Servetus has now coined Armitage Objectification Mode (AOM). Why didn’t we think of this before?! It should have been coined years ago, but I’m glad we have it now. :D I mean c’mon, we’ve all objectified Richard Armitage in one form or another. And even though I’ve said I haven’t fantasized about him, I never said I didn’t want to. LOL! I just said I chose not to do it. I’d be a big fat liar if I said I never had the yen. But as to AOM, I’m sure we’re all going to have a field day defining its various levels.

Of course I have to cover Armitage Protection Mode (APM). Posts about it are found here and here if you’re not familiar. It’s to be avoided unless you want to be a killjoy, and there are certainly various levels of APM which deserve their own modes. Armitage Correction Mode, or what I think of as APM Light. This is when someone continually feels the need to correct other fans about Armitage lore, e.g., making sure everyone knows that Guy’s horse is Richie and not Ritchie when no one else (or few; wish I could say no one else) gives a rat’s ass how the name is spelled. Did the show’s creators ever specify? Or APM Exreme which I fondly think of as Armitage Sanctimonious Syndrome (ASS). That’s when someone not only wants to protect Richard Armitage but is utterly self-righteous about it. Utterly here means the person may end up calling the authorities in an attempt to ensure dear Richard’s safety and most important that they (the person and not the authorities) can never be wrong! LOL! Yes, I laughed. I used to pity these people but have come to find them a great source of humor.

Oh, yeah, they’re funny, Rich. As if you need protecting. LOL!

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There is also Armitage Denial Mode (ADM), and its various levels go something like the following. Armitage Denial Mode Extreme — when you’re so far in the closet you won’t even breathe Richard Armitage’s name to another human being and certainly never comment on him in cyber world, yet you may be the first to look at anything posted about our guy. ;-) Armitage Denial Mode (no frills; it just is) — you think Richard Armitage is great and sometimes you deign to express it to another human being with an occasional comment in cyber world. But then you step back and wonder what has come over you?!! Armitage Denial Mode Light — you are very chatty about Richard Armitage and frequently give and take on his abilities and are recognized as a commenter but swear up and down you’re just a casual fan. Of course the remedy to all of these is called Freedom from Armitage Denial Mode — that’s when you finally say to hell with it and get yourself a blog!

note: all of this is predicated on the idea that almost everyone reading this blog is an addict. D

Screencap courtesy of RichardArmitageNet.com

Conflicted Fangirl

Yes, it’s my quarterly bout of circumspection. It started last week when I posted something sane for a change. But I cannot be completely sane if pictures like this are still floating around:

GuyofGisborne-and-his-sideburns

Before I submerge my sanity again, I want to make it clear that my wish to take Richard out of his box is also a wish for myself. I do not want to be in continual fangirl mode. Sometimes it bores me. There I said it. No, it’s not the first time I’ve said, and it won’t be the last. And I don’t want to get into a debate about desire nor diagram this photo although it begs for diagramming. I acknowledge that readily, and that the man is walking desire. But I also see something far beyond that. Much beyond that, and the sane part of me doesn’t want to lose sight of it.

However, today when I was sifting photos, this one knocked me silly again. LOL! That might be a maniacal laugh. I’m not sure yet.

And actually, this is a public service post for the new fans. Yes, indeed that’s what it is! They’re still dazed by Thorin Oakenshield, but when they’re done, they now have something else to drool over. :D

I’ve had this picture for so long that I have no clue if it’s one of my screencaps or someone else’s.

Surveying the Landscape

I’ve spent the last couple of weeks thinking about whether or not I should continue this blog. Yeah, I know I’ve said this before. Part of it is my circumspect gene pestering me. Always pestering me. Always putting me in check, and then years go by, and I regret I got in the box, that my creativity was so squelched it’s a miracle it survived. But why do I listen? Very simple answer. I don’t want to be a fool. I do not want to be a fool. Yes, I said that twice. And the reality is I’m not a fool. I have been sensible almost from the time I exited the hatch. Sensible is my frigging middle name. At least according to my family and all who have known me with more than a passing acquaintance. But back there in childhood I was able to be sensible and creative.

The other part I’ve been mulling is my longing to do something else in cyber world, and I am going to do something else. Not now, but it’s coming, and sometimes I have a hard time not talking about it. I get excited while I’m working on it and want to start gabbing, but it’s not time. Some of you know, but keep it to yourself please since I’m not ready yet.

For now I’m continuing this blog for too many reasons to explain. Suffice to say Richard Armitage is just a small part of it. No offense, Rich.

And thanks to all of you for listening to my stuff or at least some of it.

Screencap courtesy of RichardArmitageNet.com

Flying

As with the other days, please remember this is part of a much larger conversation about Richard Armitage, and you would be pleased by checking out the rest of it here.

My apologies for the delay in posting, and no, today is not about Richard Armitage and Peter Jackson. It was supposed to be today, but I’m a day behind. Sometime I might tell you why.

This piece was originally titled ‘I Think Therefore I Am a Great Actor II,’ but my need for cuteness has waned, and in its place is an overwhelming desire to be understood. The need is so great that it’s also contributed to this post being tardy, and I began drafting it a couple of months ago! Actually, the post has been brewing from the day I started this blog. No, before that.

I knew fairly early on what overwhelmed me about RA’s portrayals, but the language to explain it has eluded me; otherwise, I would have explained already. My stumbling block is not in finding some words so much as it is in wishing to use words that have no inflammatory nature. If my ability to handle words were better, then I could deal with the dangerous ones while curtailing the seemingly endless qualifiers.

In case it wasn’t obvious in the last post, the drug I keep taking is the reality created by Richard Armitage’s characters. I would say truth, but people trip on the word truth. Maybe because it’s often assumed to be the sum of all truth instead of just a truth. That does seem to be the inference from a significant number of people when the word appears. And perhaps it is such an important aspect of our lives, it rightly deserves that reaction. To be clear, I do have a definite view of the source of the truth, but it has such a richness and depth, I could never sum it up. It’s not that simple.

And people aren’t simple. It doesn’t matter who. Everyone has myriad emotions for myriad reasons with myriad manifestations of them. For another person to portray this authentically, and I don’t necessarily mean realistically but rather a portrayal that gets to the heart of a person, certainly can’t be simple. It requires what Stanislavski called “the magic if” which is an actor accessing his imagination to give a character thoughts and feelings, and in turn mannerisms and personal habits in order to convey the inner man. When I first heard Richard Armitage wrote back stories for his characters, I wondered if he was a devotee’ of Stanislavski’s method, but it wasn’t until I read the Vulpes Libris interview in July 2009, that I was sure. Oh, what a wonderful piece. For all of the supposed intellectual resources of the major media outlets, an interview on a fairly unknown blog remains my favorite, because he shared in more detail, before or since, how his mind works with respect to his craft. Thank you again, Lovely Book Foxes! I think many of us would love to read those diaries. Maybe one day.

From that interview, something else began to be clear. This tapping into the imagination and using it to make a real point of connection is Richard Armitage’s obsession, and thankfully for us, his genius. When I was reading Craig, he made an illustration of a young man wanting to become an actor and how it wasn’t really about wanting to be an actor but something else:

Perhaps you quarrelled with your parents when you were eighteen, because you wished to go on the stage, and they would not let you. They perhaps asked why you wanted to go on the stage, and you could give no reasonable answer because you wanted to do that which no reasonable answer could explain; in other words, you wanted to fly. And had you said to your parents, “I want to fly,” I think that you would have probably got further than had you alarmed them with the terrible words, “I want to go on the stage.

Millions of such men have had the same desire, this desire for movement, this desire to fly, this desire to be merged in some other creature’s being, and not knowing that it was the desire to live in the imagination, some have answered their parents, “I want to be an actor; I want to go on the stage. — Edward Gordon Craig, from On the Art of the Theatre

I saw Richard Armitage in that. Oh, not the quarrel although there could have been a quarrel, but in the desire to merge with another creature’s being. And it occurred to me that for all its appearances, this is not flying:

The heart of these characters was never revealed in any way that was terribly meaningful to me. The entire time I was watching I felt like an outsider who didn’t understand the intense relationship between these two people but was aware on some level of the writers whispering into my ear, “This is the scene where you should care.” But oh, what do you think this part would have been in the hands of Richard? And I’ll bet Kate Winslet’s performance would have been world’s better as well. I could get faint if I think about all the possibilities, and especially as I’ve been learning what flying really looks like:

It’s made me want to fly too. It’s made me want to tell stories and express some things I never have or felt I could. A few months before I knew RA existed, I did start a journal, which was something to relieve tension and rant where it could do no harm to anyone — except perhaps me. It was never for me to be a writer. But as I watched his performances, I got so stirred up and eventually knew I wanted to do in written form what he is doing. Mostly, I want to create another world in which to reveal a reality. Isn’t that what Tolkien is all about? More on that later. :D

The next post is about Richard Armitage stretching himself professionally.