Another Word about #VideotheCrucible – Now More Than Ever

Reblogged from Armitage Agonistes

I concur heartily with Perry’s thinking:

In response to this on Me and Richard, in which Servetus points out obstacles against a DVD or transfer of The Old Vic’s production of The Crucible, I have this to add.

The link in the blog was to a New York Post piece( something akin to the Daily Fail, but this was a serious article) about Arthur Miller’s daughter, Rebecca, who is the owner of the rights to Miller’s body of work, and as such, has the final say as to whether or not a production company can mount any of his plays. (Think the ownership maze that affected production of The Hobbit because of negotiations with the Tolkien family.)

In the article, Ms.Miller explains that she is selective about licensing rights to her father’s work.

The rest here

Dreaming about Uhtred

Truly, it would be a dream to see Richard Armitage in this:

BBC AMERICA Announces New Drama Series The Last Kingdom
Published: July 9, 2014

An adaptation of Bernard Cornwell’s best-selling book series by BAFTA nominated and Royal Television Society award-winning writer Stephen Butchard

New York – July 9, 2014 – BBC AMERICA, Carnival Films – the Golden Globe® and Emmy® Award-winning producers of Downton Abbey – and BBC Two announced today that production will begin this fall on The Last Kingdom, a new historical 8 x 60 drama series.

BAFTA nominated and RTS award-winning writer Stephen Butchard, (Good Cop, Five Daughters, House of Saddam), will adapt Bernard Cornwell’s best-selling franchise “The Saxon Stories” for the screen. Cornwell is also known for his much-loved “Sharpe” novels that became the long-running TV series of the same name starring Sean Bean and aired on BBC AMERICA.

Set in the year 872, when many of the separate kingdoms of what we now know as England have fallen to the invading Vikings, the great kingdom of Wessex has been left standing alone and defiant under the command of King Alfred the Great.

Against this turbulent backdrop lives our hero, Uhtred. Born the son of a Saxon nobleman, he is orphaned by the Vikings and then kidnapped and raised as one of their own. Forced to choose between the country of his birth and the people of his upbringing, his loyalties are ever tested. What is he – Saxon or Viking? On a quest to claim his birthright, Uhtred must tread a dangerous path between both sides if he is to play his part in the birth of a new nation and, ultimately, seek to recapture his ancestral lands.

The rest here

Those of you who are so adept at PhotoShop need to make us a cool graphic to swoon over. :D I’m serious despite my grin. It would be an even bigger grin if there was a graphic.

Wait a minute. Google yields all sorts of goodies. Here we go:

uthredviv1

and another one:

uthredviv2

These are both by Vivayn and can be found at RichardArmitageNet.com

Yes, my grin just got much bigger, and for anyone wanting to make their own, some inspiration:

Thorin cum Uhtred

Before you ask, no, I have not forgotten I promised to have a giveaway of Lords of the North audio book.

Meanwhile, our Friend, Bryan, now has a page on The Crucible

Crucible 2-filteredBryan is just back from Tokyo and has updated his site to include The Crucible. I don’t know, and I could be wrong (obviously I don’t think so), but I’m thinking Bryan is definitely fun loving and therefore fits with this bunch. Maybe not as a Richard Armitage zealot so much but as someone who is experienced and articulate and most important, wants to articulate! Thanks for that wonderful effort on your site, Bryan!

And he may prompt me to buy a plane ticket to London since I cannot stop reading his site and now long ferociously to see London theater, er, theatre.

Page is here.

Colliding Identities

RichardArmitage as SvengaliSeveral people sent me links to the newest interview with Richard Armitage. I finally read it yesterday, and then googled the journalist’s name, because I will admit unashamedly I didn’t know who she was. No, I am not cosmopolitan enough to be aware of all these journalists and their quests to capture the zeitgeist. But I digress.

There was a little angst going on in what I was reading. The almost palpable need to set someone or something straight was coming indignantly off the page toward me. Self-righteousness like that usually gets a negative reaction. “Judge not lest ye be judged…” kind of runs through my head, and I want to apply “the same measure” to the offender (no pun intended). I try to resist that, and I’m resisting today mainly because it’s not beneficial. If you don’t know what I’m referring to, oh well.

Mostly, I care what I think. Richard Armitage is something amongst actors I had never seen before. Many of us had never seen his like, and when I say that I’m not talking about his sexiness and the objectifying response that can provoke. I’m thinking of his ability to pierce reality with an elegant sword. Most actors I’ve seen use a club. But to be pricked with something powerful that is there and gone and you try to bring it back so you can take it apart to examine it and understand it and maybe recapture its sweetness, doesn’t happen very often. It’s special.

The journalist didn’t get this, because she couldn’t seem to get much past his pretty face or us. Maybe she didn’t have time to really understand him or us. Maybe she was under a deadline and worked with what she had. I know a couple of journalists reading this who are going to laugh at that notion. But hey, I’m trying to be charitable here. However, I believe she is like many in the press who don’t get Richard Armitage, because they have also never seen his like — someone who is himself, someone not easily whipped into bits of identity for quick public consumption. Is there any doubt that article was an attempt at a whipping?

What can be worse for a journalist than to ever think they don’t understand something or someone enough to make it into a tidy pronouncement? That is anathema and has to gall someone whose business is mostly summing up things and people. Yet how wonderful it would have been if she had seemed at least fair about who he has demonstrated himself to be over the course of years while passing judgment. There was almost none of that, and what was there seemed almost grudging and therefore a bit disingenuous, or maybe she’s just a poor writer. I honestly don’t know.

But I do know the summation was cliched. What else explains the portrayal of Richard Armitage as Svengali right down to the damn photo. LOL! (Sorry, I really did laugh. When I start writing as a journalist for a big time newspaper, I won’t throw in that kind of commentary. ;-) ) Like many of you I wondered about the graphic used in the article, but the text makes it obvious. He’s Svengali and those who find him appealing are Trilby — no good at anything really unless he hypnotizes us into thinking we are. How sad the interviewer was so afraid to let herself really observe someone like Richard. But then prejudice has always been fueled by fear.

Instead we got something intended to be a bit of an expose’ but sounded more like real fiction at times. And that got me to thinking. To thinking what has occurred to me on a few occasions when I’ve encountered someone who was so adamantly not a fan. The fear of truly observing someone like Richard Armitage is that he may cast a spell on the observer, and they may actually lose their godlike objectivity. Or they are closet fans desperately trying to appear fair. Yeah, I know the signs. I’ve been there. Whatever the case, this is what I long to say:

Ms. Gold,

You are missing out. Being innocent is not so bad, and really, if this is what it feels like, I want more of it.

Signed,
One of Richard’s crazy fans who is having a whale of a time :D

P.S. I don’t think your insult of Richard Armitage is going to have any impact on your career. You know that. But insulting Dawn French and overweight women? That was dumb and tipped your hand more than anything you said.

If you want to read the article, Guylty has it here.

You Wanted the Input of a Seasoned Theater Goer…

I saw this in the very recent stream of tweets from The Crucible performance this evening in London. When I got over to Bryan Thomas’s profile, I was curious about his background with theater. It didn’t take long to find out this is someone who has seen a lot, and if you want to know what, he’s listed the performances he’s seen since 1972. There are performances other than theater listed, but read the list and you will know Bryan knows whereof he speaks when he made that tweet.

I would love to hear more from Bryan!

edit: Well, I’ve now spent a couple of hours at Bryan’s site, which has been registered since 1999. He’s not only a theater lover, but a helluva photographer. There’s a story with him, and if by some freak chance he comes over to look at this crazy fan’s site, I really would love to talk to him.

And Now Meg’s Take on The Crucible

The Old Vic by Meg Siobhan

Guest post by Meg Siobhan:

So, this evening (well, last night as I’m writing this on the last train home, surrounded by many a loud drunk…) I went to see The Crucible, with our favourite tall, dark and handsome chap, Richard Armitage.

This was my first time seeing anything at The Old Vic Theatre, so I was very excited – even more excited to be seeing Richard, in theatre, the evening before my birthday.

So when my dad and I got there, we collected the tickets, made our way to the floor, and the door we needed to go in, in order to be seated.

Supposedly the set design meant that the seats we were originally going to have would have decreased in value and have restricted view. The seats we got in place of these were still great, in the main dress circle. From where we were sat, our original seats didn’t look affected at all, so don’t know what was going on there…

Anyway, on to the play.

Now, I’m a sucker for good lighting, and I felt this show had absolutely beautiful lighting. Its simplicity was what made it so striking.

I won’t divulge major details about the play if you are yet to see it, but if you’ve been on social networks, you will know that Richard is shirtless for part of a scene. Yes, I was swooning.

It was beautifully staged, and the entire cast was fantastic.

There was one moment I loved in the encore when we were all applauding. They came out once, and bowed – vanished and returned, as per any usual encore. But the second time, Richard let everyone else leave the stage, and as they did, he just smiled to the entire audience, taking in the applause.

I think he was happy with how this opening night went, just like many of us who absolutely adored it. It was good to see this side of him!

If I could, I would give them all a big splat on the back for a job well done.

I think, a brilliant return to the theatre for Richard and I would happily watch the play many times.

You can find Meg at Twitter, Instagram and her blog.

Photo Courtesy of Meg Siobhan

[edit: Meg gives a fuller account at her blog]

What Sophie Saw: The Crucible

Ditto what Velvet said. :D

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,069 other followers