And It Keeps Coming

Living through the last six weeks has been rough and today especially so. The Old Vic sent me an email. They do that from time to time when you join their cause. Oh, I appreciate the emails, and under normal circumstances I would be happy to read a notice or two they want to give me. But it’s really hard to witness all the goings on about The Crucible and not being able to fully join in and getting mail from The Old Vic is just a reminder of all that I’m missing. Frankly, I would almost give my eye teeth to go to a performance. Of course it wouldn’t matter if I did because SO would kill me when I got back home.

And those reviews!

The-Crucible-Reviews

And that’s just The Old Vic’s side of the pond! I seem to remember a few on my side that were pretty complimentary. Hear that, Old Vic? Come to New York and soon! I have a feeling you will, and I was pretty heartened by this and some other rhetoric I’ve heard from the New York theater community which indicates there is a pretty good chance of this happening. The only question is whether Richard will be involved.

If I know him, and yes, I do a bit after all this time of watching a lot of his cussed moves, he will not let any grass grow under his feet, and we may well be hearing any day now what he’s about to do next. No, seriously, I’m thinking before the end of August we’ll be hearing about it. *Looks at watch* Yep, end of August drop dead. Probably mid-August. Anyway, The Old Vic needs to jump on it and have him locked in for next year or whenever.

None of that is to say this next announcement will be about a production in New York. No, it will probably be something different. Uhtred perhaps? Or is Richard past all that and now onto more intellectually stimulating fare? I do wonder these things when I have time to wonder, which I don’t as often these days, and that’s a good thing, ’cause if I did have time to really ponder with any depth all that’s going on with Richard, this email from The Old Vic would send my frustration through the roof:

Richard Armitage Conversations

Damn, I wish I had been to see the play, but I’m glad some of you have been able to see it and thoroughly enjoy it. That warms my heart because well, I’m proud of our guy and any adulation he gets which celebrates his talent is a thrill. No snark there. It really does warm my heart that he’s doing so well. I’m not sure I feel motherly about it but maybe.

Dear Rich,

May I say I always knew you had it in you. Or at least after I watched John Standring. I suspected before Standring. John Thornton was breathtaking, but I chalked that up to being enthralled by a great love story. Harry Kennedy was another thrill, but there wasn’t enough to convince that the depths of your talent were so great. Then came Guy. You didn’t stint even on that silly piece. But it was John Standring that made me a fan for life. I knew then you were made of something far more than a heartthrob. And I’d like to think I would never be this enthusiastic over a mere heartthrob. So your success is my vindication. Thanks for that. And hell, I haven’t even seen the play.

All the best,
A Crazy Fan who looks forward to more of your stellar work; see, see, you’ve set the bar damn high, my friend

More info here about Richard Armitage in Conversation. Maybe you’ll break down and join The Old Vic? Hmm.

Another Word about #VideotheCrucible – Now More Than Ever

Reblogged from Armitage Agonistes

I concur heartily with Perry’s thinking:

In response to this on Me and Richard, in which Servetus points out obstacles against a DVD or transfer of The Old Vic’s production of The Crucible, I have this to add.

The link in the blog was to a New York Post piece( something akin to the Daily Fail, but this was a serious article) about Arthur Miller’s daughter, Rebecca, who is the owner of the rights to Miller’s body of work, and as such, has the final say as to whether or not a production company can mount any of his plays. (Think the ownership maze that affected production of The Hobbit because of negotiations with the Tolkien family.)

In the article, Ms.Miller explains that she is selective about licensing rights to her father’s work.

The rest here

You Wanted the Input of a Seasoned Theater Goer…

I saw this in the very recent stream of tweets from The Crucible performance this evening in London. When I got over to Bryan Thomas’s profile, I was curious about his background with theater. It didn’t take long to find out this is someone who has seen a lot, and if you want to know what, he’s listed the performances he’s seen since 1972. There are performances other than theater listed, but read the list and you will know Bryan knows whereof he speaks when he made that tweet.

I would love to hear more from Bryan!

edit: Well, I’ve now spent a couple of hours at Bryan’s site, which has been registered since 1999. He’s not only a theater lover, but a helluva photographer. There’s a story with him, and if by some freak chance he comes over to look at this crazy fan’s site, I really would love to talk to him.

And Now Meg’s Take on The Crucible

The Old Vic by Meg Siobhan

Guest post by Meg Siobhan:

So, this evening (well, last night as I’m writing this on the last train home, surrounded by many a loud drunk…) I went to see The Crucible, with our favourite tall, dark and handsome chap, Richard Armitage.

This was my first time seeing anything at The Old Vic Theatre, so I was very excited – even more excited to be seeing Richard, in theatre, the evening before my birthday.

So when my dad and I got there, we collected the tickets, made our way to the floor, and the door we needed to go in, in order to be seated.

Supposedly the set design meant that the seats we were originally going to have would have decreased in value and have restricted view. The seats we got in place of these were still great, in the main dress circle. From where we were sat, our original seats didn’t look affected at all, so don’t know what was going on there…

Anyway, on to the play.

Now, I’m a sucker for good lighting, and I felt this show had absolutely beautiful lighting. Its simplicity was what made it so striking.

I won’t divulge major details about the play if you are yet to see it, but if you’ve been on social networks, you will know that Richard is shirtless for part of a scene. Yes, I was swooning.

It was beautifully staged, and the entire cast was fantastic.

There was one moment I loved in the encore when we were all applauding. They came out once, and bowed – vanished and returned, as per any usual encore. But the second time, Richard let everyone else leave the stage, and as they did, he just smiled to the entire audience, taking in the applause.

I think he was happy with how this opening night went, just like many of us who absolutely adored it. It was good to see this side of him!

If I could, I would give them all a big splat on the back for a job well done.

I think, a brilliant return to the theatre for Richard and I would happily watch the play many times.

You can find Meg at Twitter, Instagram and her blog.

Photo Courtesy of Meg Siobhan

[edit: Meg gives a fuller account at her blog]

What Sophie Saw: The Crucible

Ditto what Velvet said. :D

A Fair Night of Rippling

Richard Armitage as John Proctor

Yep, I’d say this ranks up there as one of the best nights for Richard Armitage rippling. I know I had fun. Feeling a little drunk right now, but that’s what usually happens when we go into a full-throttle ripple. Meaning almost non-stop.

Dear Mr. Spacey and The Old Vic Company,

Thank you for a wonderful night!

Signed,
A once crazy fan who has now been vindicated

Speaking of which:

Oh yeah! I had to do that again.

Dear John,

I’m so glad my first dear John letter breaks from the traditional and is something upbeat.

You will never know what your words mean to so many fans who have long seen what you were privy to last evening.

We really, really appreciate it.

A Friend

P.S. You’re right. I can be a follower and a fan too. :)

Best Tweet of the Night

Yep, that’s right, I’m doing this one again. It deserves at least two posts if not many, many more.